PHENAKISTASCOPE KIT

                                             Optical Kits from Primary Science Resource Packs

Was the first optical toy to create a true sense of motion.

The Phenakistascope or spindle viewer was invented in 1831 by Belgian physicist Joseph Plateau and simultaneously in Vienna by Simon Stampfer who called his invention a stroboscope.

The Phenakistascope consists of a disc with 10-16 slots equally spaced around the edge. Between each slot is an image. The user spins the disc and looks through the moving slots at the disc's reflection in a mirror. The slots stop the images blurring together so that the user sees a rapid succession of separate images. When the images are identical the user will a stationary image. Scientist Michael Faraday had experimented with such a disc.

Plateau realised that if he drew images which changed slightly each time showing a sequence of moves the brain would interpret this as a moving image.

He decided that in order to create a good sense of movement the eye needed to see 16 individual images or frames per second. Old silent films run at 16-18 frames per second - modern films run at 24 frames per second.

          











                       

                        This is own new version from June 2019  - More of a mechanical device.     

CONTENTS: Black wooden circular disc, 7 x patterns, 1 x blank (for you to design your own), handle, motor housing, small wooden disc and Instructions. - YOU NEED A MIRROR AND A PAIR OF SCISSORS.

Place the black disc onto the motor spindle, then choose one of the picture and place it on top of the black disc and over the motor spindle, finally secure with small wooden disc .

FACE A MIRROR - HOLDING THE PICTURE TOWARDS THE MIRROR. SPIN THE WOODEN DISC AROUND TAND LOOK THE THE SLITS TO SEE THE FIGURES MOVE.             

                                                            P29A PRICE INCLUDES POSTAGE                             photos

 

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